Panax Ginseng Boosts Testosterone, Nitric Oxide & Much More!

Panax ginseng boosts testosterone

What is Panax Ginseng?

Panax Ginseng is an ancient herb/root native to China and Korea.

It is derived from the same species of plant as Korean or Red Ginseng (not be confused with American or Siberian forms of the herb which are different) and is one of the most studied and scientifically proven herbs on the face of the earth.

While it has been shown to have a direct effect on testosterone in infertile men, it’s benefits to testosterone in fertile men are more likely, similar to maca root, in correlation to its overall effect of general health and wellbeing including boosting the endocrine system and increasing nitric oxide levels.

 

Panax Ginseng Increases Nitric Oxide (NO)

Ginseng increases nitric oxide blood flowOne of the biggest benefits from ginseng is its ability to directly stimulate the central nervous system and increase nitric oxide.

The herb contains special chemicals known as “ginsenosides” which increase the conversion of arginine (an amino acid) to nitric oxide.

Nitric oxide dilates blood vessels and can increase blood flow, boost endurance, build muscle mass, and strength.

 

Panax Ginseng Boosts the Endocrine System

Panax Ginseng Boosts the Endocrine SystemThe endocrine system includes every gland in your body which makes hormones including your testicles and the hypothalamus, pituitary and pineal glands in your brain.

If your endocrine systems isn’t functioning at full capacity, it will be impossible for you to maximize your testosterone production.

Especially because testosterone is produced in your testicles and they are part of the endocrine system.

Panax ginseng has a powerful set of nutrients and antioxidants including ginsenosides which nourish your endocrine and nervous system.

This keeps you running at optimal capacity for peak testosterone levels.

 

Other Health Benefits

Because there are so many positive effects ranging from improved libido, to blood flow, to happiness, I will simply bullet point them out as it is far to reaching for the scope of this article to do an in-depth write up on each positive aspect.

Has been shown to increase and/or improve

  • Testosterone (1)
  • Cognition (2 – 5)
  • Erection Satisfaction (6 – 9)
  • Overall Wellbeing and Happiness (2, 3, 10)
  • All three main antioxidant enzymes SOD, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase (11, 12)
  • Blood Flow (13, 14)
  • Calmness (3)
  • Endothelial Function (13)

Has been shown to positively decrease

  • Inflammation and Muscle Damage (15)
  • DNA Damage (12)
  • General Oxidation / Powerful antioxidant (11)

 

How to Supplement with Panax Ginseng

In my opinion, ginseng should be taken by everyone, especially men.

It has been a highly touted herb in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries and modern science continues to prove its wide-ranging benefits to human health.

It will do a significant amount of work to keep your body and endocrine system running at a peak level and that will in turn help to maximize your testosterone levels.

I recommend you supplement with 200 – 300 mg of Panax Ginseng daily that has at least 20% ginsenosides.

Discover more of the best testosterone boosting herbs, vitamins and foods.

 

References:

  1. Salvati, G., et al., Effects of Panax Ginseng C.A. Meyer saponins on male fertility. Panminerva Med, 1996. 38(4): p. 249-54. – Link
  2. Ellis, J.M. and P. Reddy, Effects of Panax ginseng on quality of life. Ann Pharmacother, 2002. 36(3): p. 375-9. – Link
  3. Reay, J.L., A.B. Scholey, and D.O. Kennedy, (G115) improves aspects of working memory performance and subjective ratings of calmness in healthy young adults. Hum Psychopharmacol, 2010. 25(6): p. 462-71. – Link
  4. Reay, J.L., D.O. Kennedy, and A.B. Scholey, Effects of Panax ginseng, consumed with and without glucose, on blood glucose levels and cognitive performance during sustained ‘mentally demanding’ tasks. J Psychopharmacol, 2006. 20(6): p. 771-81. – Link
  5. Reay, J.L., D.O. Kennedy, and A.B. Scholey, Single doses of (G115) reduce blood glucose levels and improve cognitive performance during sustained mental activity. J Psychopharmacol, 2005. 19(4): p. 357-65. – Link
  6. de Andrade, E., et al., Study of the efficacy of Korean Red Ginseng in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Asian J Androl, 2007. 9(2): p. 241-4. – Link
  7. Kim, T.H., et al., Effects of tissue-cultured mountain ginseng extract on male patients with erectile dysfunction. Asian J Androl, 2009. 11(3): p. 356-61. – Link
  8. Hong, B., et al., A double-blind crossover study evaluating the efficacy of korean red ginseng in patients with erectile dysfunction: a preliminary report. J Urol, 2002. 168(5): p. 2070-3. – Link
  9. Choi, H.K., D.H. Seong, and K.H. Rha, Clinical efficacy of Korean red ginseng for erectile dysfunction. Int J Impot Res, 1995. 7(3): p. 181-6. – Link
  10. Sotaniemi, E.A., E. Haapakoski, and A. Rautio, Ginseng therapy in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Diabetes Care, 1995. 18(10): p. 1373-5. – Link
  11. Kim, H.G., et al., Antioxidant effects of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer in healthy subjects: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Food Chem Toxicol, 2011. 49(9): p. 2229-35. – Link
  12. Kim, J.Y., et al., Beneficial effects of Korean red ginseng on lymphocyte DNA damage, antioxidant enzyme activity, and LDL oxidation in healthy participants: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Nutr J, 2012. 11: p. 47. – Link
  13. Jovanovski, E., et al., Effects of Korean red ginseng and its isolated ginsenosides and polysaccharides on arterial stiffness in healthy individuals. Am J Hypertens, 2010. 23(5): p. 469-72. – Link
  14. Ahn, C.M., et al., Red ginseng extract improves coronary flow reserve and increases absolute numbers of various circulating angiogenic cells in patients with first ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. Phytother Res, 2011. 25(2): p. 239-49. – Link
  15. Jung, H.L., et al., Effects of Panax ginseng supplementation on muscle damage and inflammation after uphill treadmill running in humans. Am J Chin Med, 2011. 39(3): p. 441-50. – Link

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