Glutathione for Sleep, Memory, and Health

Glutathione Sandman Alpha Wolf Nutrition
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What are the Health Benefits of Glutathione?

It may be the secret to prevent heart disease, cancer, aging, and dementia. Glutathione is also used to treat medical conditions like autism, Parkinson’s, glaucoma, and Alzheimer’s disease.

It can even be used to save patients who suffer from heavy metal and drug poisoning.

Glutathione, also called GSH, is a substance produced naturally by our bodies and is present within every cell – where it acts as a master antioxidant and detoxifier to protect us from the oxidative stress that causes many chronic and acute conditions (1).

Glutathione is produced naturally in the liver, but it’s also found in fruits, vegetables, and different types of meat.

However, if you suffer from poor sleep quality; you may be running low on this health-enhancing compound. The association between GSH and sleep is still being investigated, but studies show a clear relationship between sleep deprivation and low levels of this extremely potent antioxidant (2).

Sleep Detoxifies the Brain, Glutathione plays an Essential Role

Glutathione in Sandman Sleep AidAccording to one study, we feel the need to sleep when certain “hypnotoxic” chemicals build up to sufficient levels in the brain to signal a need for restorative sleep. Glutathione was found to be a sleep promoting substance (SPS) that exerts a complementary action on the major neurotransmitter systems in the brain that brings healthy, restorative sleep (3).

The researchers conclude that glutathione may work to enhance sleep by counteracting excitotoxic events (4) that keep the brain from resting. So GSH helps sleep through a process of neuronal restitution and detoxification at the brain’s cellular level (5).

Optimal Glutathione Levels are Essential for Health

According to research published in the Journal of Nutrition, maintaining optimal levels of glutathione is essential for peak health (6).

The study authors report that glutathione not only plays a critical role in our antioxidant defenses, but is a crucial component needed to both absorb nutrients and regulate many biological processes, including the immune response.

They also point out the role of glutathione deficiency in oxidative stress, which influences the development of many medical conditions like:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Liver disease
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Various cancers
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes

Glutathione Depletion and Alzheimer’s Disease

Recently, a multicenter and international team of researchers from the National Brain Research Center in India, published a series of studies that explored this powerful antioxidant and the role it plays in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (7).

They used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, to first show the ability to detect two different types of glutathione in humans (8); a closed form and an extended form (9).

Next, they demonstrated that there was glutathione depletion in the hippocampus, cingulate, and prefrontal cortex in patients with mild cognitive impairment or dementia caused by Alzheimer’s disease.

They conclude that this is sufficient evidence to seriously consider glutathione supplementation as an effective way to increase our cognitive reserves and even prevent the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Glutathione and Parkinson’s Disease

Glutathione levels inevitably decrease as we age (10) and with some medical conditions, like Parkinson’s disease (PD).

People living with PD typically have lower glutathione levels in their brains, specifically in an area called the substantia nigra, which is where dopamine producing cells are lost (11).

Glutathione levels have also been associated with the severity of Parkinson’s disease; less glutathione usually means more advanced PD symptoms (12).

A 2014 study concludes that neurons, being the most metabolically active cells in the body, are the most vulnerable to free radical damage – and benefit most from the protective antioxidant properties of GSH (13).

The findings suggest strongly that glutathione supplementation can play a powerful role in the prevention and treatment of PD.

Sandman by Alpha Wolf Nutrition features Glutathione

To get maximum absorption out of glutathione you need to wrap it in liposomes but not all liposomes are created equal.

Our Sandman 100% natural sleep aid is manufactured with with liposomes using no heat, no high pressure and as small as 50 nanometers!

We also include:

  • GABA – helps body and mind to relax and fall asleep
  • L-theanine – helps increase relaxation and lower stress
  • Melatonin – helps control your daily sleep-wake cycles

To help ensure you get the best, most refreshing night’s sleep you will ever experience.

REFERENCES

  1. Pizzorno, Joseph. “Glutathione!.” Integrative medicine (Encinitas, Calif.) vol. 13,1 (2014): 8-12 – Link
  2. Trivedi MS, Holger D, Bui AT, Craddock TJA, Tartar JL. Short-term sleep deprivation leads to decreased systemic redox metabolites and altered epigenetic status. PLoS One. 2017;12(7):e0181978. Published 2017 Jul 24. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181978 – Link
  3. Trivedi MS, Holger D, Bui AT, Craddock TJA, Tartar JL. Short-term sleep deprivation leads to decreased systemic redox metabolites and altered epigenetic status. PLoS One. 2017;12(7):e0181978. Published 2017 Jul 24. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181978 – Link
  4. Dong XX, Wang Y, Qin ZH. Molecular mechanisms of excitotoxicity and their relevance to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2009;30(4):379–387. doi:10.1038/aps.2009.24 – Link
  5. Aoyama K, et al. Increased neuronal glutathione and neuroprotection in GTRAP3-18-deficient mice. Neurobiol Dis. 2012 Mar;45(3):973-82. doi: 10.1016/j.nbd.2011.12.016. Epub 2011 Dec 14 – Link
  6. Harold E. Seifried, et al. Executive Summary Report. The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 134, Issue 11, November 2004, Pages 3143S–3163S – Link
  7. Shukla D, Mandal PK, Ersland L, et al. A Multi-Center Study on Human Brain Glutathione Conformation using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;66(2):517–532. doi:10.3233/JAD-180648 – Link 
  8. Patricia Begas, Linda Liedgens, Anna Moseler, Andreas J. Meyer, Marcel Deponte. Glutaredoxin catalysis requires two distinct glutathione interaction sites. Nature Communications volume 8, Article number: 14835 (2017) – Link
  9. Shukla D, Mandal PK, Ersland L, et al. A Multi-Center Study on Human Brain Glutathione Conformation using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;66(2):517–532. doi:10.3233/JAD-180648 – Link
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